Dreams Blog

February 22, 2013

  I had some thoughts inspired by Wallace Matthews and John Feinstein that just couldn’t wait until next week. 

Organizational Need
The NCAA has to re-organize or disappear.
John Feinstein (DC Post) went to town on their make-up or lack there of.
“The NCAA accelerated its path toward irrelevance years ago, when, NCAA President, Mark Emmert’s predecessors, Cedric Dempsey and Myles Brand, ceded control of football to conference commissioners — wanting no blame for the cartel that was the Bowl Championship Series when it was created 15 years ago. That abdication of ownership is a major reason why conference realignment has been allowed to burn out of control like a wildfire. In absence of any central authority, conference commissioners have been able to pillage one another for schools in order to try to maximize their appeal to television networks. If the NCAA controlled football and if there were rules in place that prevented schools from jumping conferences haphazardly, the current chaos would never have started. That’s mainly because the organization is made up of academics such as Emmert, who lack a sophisticated understanding of all the forces at work in modern athletics. Seventeen of the 20 members of the NCAA executive council are either college presidents or chancellors. There are three token members who are involved in athletics — two commissioners and one athletic director — who apparently are there to explain to the other members which one is the funny-shaped ball and which one is the round one and, no doubt to fetch coffee when needed.         So not only is Emmert’s status under no threat — the presidents aren’t going to humiliate one of their own — any replacement approved by that group isn’t going to be substantially different. But even if the NCAA had competent leadership, it would be time to start all over again. For several years now, Duke basketball Coach Mike Krzyzewski has been saying that there should be three separate organizations, not one. “We need an organization that does what’s best for college football, one that does what’s best for [men’s] college basketball and one that does what’s best for non-revenue sports,” Krzyzewski proposes. “The needs of each are too different for us to keep acting like they’re the same thing. They’re not.”                                                                                                   I can’t see any changes on the horizon. It would signal the existence of errors committed by or weaknesses to the Academics in charge.
A Backward Advancement
Wallace Matthews (ESPNNY.com) has been following the change in Hal Steinbrenner’s thinking. “In light of the mounting evidence that the New York Yankees are now suddenly, desperately seeking to hold onto Robinson Cano, I asked a baseball person with intimate knowledge of the Yankees, Scott Boras and the economics of the game in general if there was any chance the Bombers and Cano could reach agreement on a contract extension without having to get into a full-scale bidding war on the free-agent market.
The man responded with an expletive, followed by the word “no.”
Which doesn’t mean Cano will not be a Yankee next year, only that the Yankees aren’t going to get off as lightly as they have for the past two seasons, when they enjoyed the services of a Rogers Hornsby-caliber player at an Ian Kinsler-level paycheck.
But rather than focus on the likelihood that Hal Steinbrenner’s attempt to avoid the feeding frenzy of free agency will fail, Yankees fans should be encouraged by the fact that he is at least willing to play the game.
As another source told me on Wednesday, “This is the first time since George died that it appears a Steinbrenner is actually running the Yankees.”
Translation: That $189 million? Forget about it. Large checks are about to be cut, not payroll.                                                               In any case, Hal’s recent words and deeds indicate if not a sea change in his thinking, at least a shift in his perception of how the Yankees should be run.
Up until a few weeks ago, he seemed to be under the impression that the New York Yankees were a business, like IBM or the American Shipbuilding Company once owned and operated by his old man.
Now, he seems to realize that the only bottom line that truly matters with the Yankees is the win-loss record, and preferably of games played in late October.                                                                     But it could be that by letting Cano know how much he wants him back, Steinbrenner is also letting the rest of baseball know that the sleeping bear is rousing from its nap.                                                                         And there is another, more visceral reason for Steinbrenner’s attitude adjustment. He seems to have learned what his father instinctively knew: That everyone loves a winner, but nobody likes a finance geek.
According to the proverbial insider with knowledge, Hal was “freaked out” by the negative reaction from Yankees fans at what they perceived to be a trend toward “cheapness” from a club that had always been known for wild extravagance.
(I’m not privy to the internal financial workings of the Yankees, but it’s possible that advance season ticket sales for 2013 have reflected that perception.)
In any event, someone within the Yankees organization apparently did the math and came to the conclusion that cutting tens of millions of dollars in payroll would cost the club hundreds of millions in the long run, if only through the devaluing of the brand.
Over the past five years, baseball’s revenues have gone nowhere but up. This is certainly no time for the Yankees’ payroll to be going down.
The immediate beneficiary of Hal’s epiphany, of course, is Cano, because just the fact that the Yankees are in the game is bound to raise everyone else’s level of play. By that I mean the Dodgers, the Nationals and whoever else feels like buying a lottery ticket on the best second baseman in the game now knows it’s going to take some serious coin. And Cano is going to make some serious bank, maybe even rivaling the 10-year, $275 million deal the Yankees gave Alex Rodriguez in 2007.
But the secondary beneficiaries, of course, will be Yankees fans, who for a while there thought they might have to live in the same world fans of just about every other team live in. A world in which you have to make do with whatever’s already on the shelf, and no money to go out and buy something shiny and new.
Perish the thought.

    
 

Dreams Blog

February 22, 2013

 
Trust
Jerry Greene (Orlando Sentinel) talked about the honesty of today’s athletes.                                                                          “Trust.                                                                                                                                  Simple word, easy to spell. But increasingly difficult to believe, both in and out of sports.                                                             This loss of trust in sports really hurts because there was a time when we turned to sports for outcomes we could accept without question. After a day when we didn’t trust the mechanic who worked on our car and the dentist who said we needed a new mouth and the girlfriend who said we are her only true love, we could turn to sports and trust in the scoreboard.                                                                                                                              Well, here’s my stand: I’m a Pollyanna and proud of it! I trust you until you have done something to betray that trust. I believe in innocence until proven guilty even though many of us have done a 180 on that, saying, “How can that sports star prove he isn’t a cheat?”
No, can you prove that he is?
For example, I hear people questioning Adrian Peterson’s recovery and amazing season. I do not. I loved his comeback and choose to continue loving it.
Have I been disappointed and will I be disappointed again? You betcha. I’m not a fool. I know people do distrustful things all the time, but I refuse to believe all the people are distrustful all of the time.
However, if you want to sell me some swampland in the Everglades, I said I was a Pollyanna but I am a cheap Pollyanna.”                 Of course, when a player like “Joe D.”played, the press was still reluctant to delve into personal lives as they are today- except when Marilyn Monroe was involved. He was one of my favorite players when I was younger (I don’t think any of us had idols back then). Joe DiMaggio appeared to be an individual who was larger than life and if you looked up Yankee in the dictionary you’d see his picture. One day he was asked by a young teammate why he “busted it every day” and he answered, “There might be someone out there who is seeing me play for the first time.” This is the Yankee Credo.    
ESPN Said
(Robinson) “Cano will HAVE to play this season under a team option that will pay him $15MILLION.”
False Idols
In today’s world athletes are lifted onto inspirational stages when they don’t belong there. Mike Wise (DC Post) gave us his thoughts with: Why do we keep searching for real-life inspiration from our athletic heroes after they do so much to disappoint us as citizens?             On and on the contradictions go, the reality that many champions of sport are hardly champions of life.                                                 Before the next definitive magazine or broadcast piece is written or taped, can’t we just admit we don’t really know anybody anymore. We think we do, but we don’t. And more than ever we’re duped by Web sites and handlers who feed false narratives that carefully camouflage flawed humans who happen to be great at what they do.                                                                                                      If we genuinely are going to enjoy sports on any guiltless level, isn’t there a need to permanently separate the song from the singer, the performer from the performance?”
He’s Right!                                                                                        Dwight Perry (Seattle Times) quoted Alan Ray who observed that what the game and the concession stands had in common on NBA All-Star Weekend: “Overpriced hot dogs.”                                          Heads In The Ground
The Int’l Olympic Committee (IOC) has made a big mistake- they dropped wrestling competition from the 2020 games and kept the Modern Pentathlon (shooting, swimming, fencing, equestrianism, and cross country running).                                  There were 71 nations that sent wrestling teams and 26 sent Pentathlon competitors to the last games.                      From The Original “Ueck”                                                                          Dwight Perry (Seattle Times) told us about a near miss. “A 150-foot asteroid passed within 17,000 miles of Earth last week.         Or to hear Bob Uecker call it, just a bit outside.”                      “Suit-happy” Doesn’t Indicate Fashion Sense                                    Mike Bianci (Orlando Sentinel) gave us the high sign about some possible legal matters. “If I’m University of Kentucky freshman Nerlens Noel and I never fully recover from a severe knee injury suffered earlier this week in a loss to the Florida Gators, I’d sue Stern, the NBA and the NBA Players Association for the $200 million Noel might have made in the course of his professional career.                                                                                        Charlotte Observer columnist Tom Sorensen wrote a thought-provoking piece the other day suggesting Jadeveon Clowney, the monster defensive end from South Carolina, should consider sitting out his junior season this year, signing with an agent and preparing for next year’s NFL draftWhy should Clowney risk his future by coming back and playing for the Gamecocks next season? What if he wrecks his body like his South Carolina teammate — running back Marcus Lattimore — did. Lattimore probably would have been a first-round draft pick after a stellar freshman season, but he tore up one knee as a sophomore and shredded the other knee as a junior. Now, he probably won’t even be drafted.
Stan Van Gundy is right. How is it that hockey players, baseball players, tennis players and golfers can turn pro right after high school, but basketball and football players cannot? Could it be because college football and college basketball provides a free minor-league system for the NFL and NBA and unlimited marketing for the future stars of those leagues?
“We’re calling these kids student-athletes, but they’re not,” says high-powered Orlando attorney John Morgan. “They’re professional athletes forced to play for free in a minor league .The NBA, the NFL and the NCAA are in collusion. Everybody is making a lot of money but the kids.”                                              The Next Pope                                                                                               Gerry Greene (Orlando Sentinel) gave us this suggestion: “We can wager on who will be the next Pope. I’m putting 20 bucks on Patrick James “Pat” Riley. He looks the part and he was born in (Are you ready for this?) Rome, New York. I can see the white smoke now.                                                                                                       He knows C-sickness                                                                                                      Dwight Perry (Seattle Times) passed along this statement by a disgruntled Carnival Cruise Line passenger, “I’ve seen worse,” bragged one passenger as he disembarked from the ill-fated Carnival Cruise ship Triumph. “But then again, I’m a Cubs fan.”

Dreams Blog

February 15, 2013

Molinaro’s Paterno/Freeh Slant                                                          People will believe what they want to believe, but the most understanding among us realize that both reports – Freeh’s and the one produced by Paterno’s supporters – are less than definitive.                                                                                                                   The Freeh report tried too hard to arrive at profound statements. It overreached. The Paterno rebuttal does much the same. People were paid to discredit the Freeh investigation and – what do you know – they found that it wrongly condemned Paterno.”Full of inaccuracies,” declared former U.S. attorney general Richard Thornburgh.                                                                                                                        But as ESPN.com noted, before he signed up with the Paterno team, Thornburgh was on record as saying that the Freeh report would be required reading at universities across the country.                                                                                                                                  Now Thornburgh finds Freeh’s findings to be riddled with “bias” and questions the “credibility of the entire report.                                                                                           “Some of us may just want to move on from this story. But we shouldn’t without pausing to reflect on one final thing.                                                                                                       Joe Paterno has been dead more than a year, but with the campaign to resurrect his image up and running, it’s as important as ever to remember that Paterno and his legacy are not the victims here.
Hand Wringers
The Sports Curmudgeon resides in the DC area that is rife with “Hand Wringers.” About this stage every year they start stirring and go on a great deal to show how politically correct they are. The SC had this to say: “I do not mean to endorse the use of a team name that is offensive to many people. I am simply tired of all the impotent hand wringing evidenced by letter writers to the Washington Post and by columnists in the Washington Post. Other than the adrenaline rush one gets when seeing one’s words take such a noble stand in a publication, those writings change nothing. They belong in a category of their own that I would label “Blatherreha”.                                                                                       The owner of the Washington Redskins and the National Football League, which issues him the franchise to own this team, have made the following situation crystal clear: As long as the NFL team housed in Washington continues to bring in revenues in the top 10% of all NFL teams, there is no reason to change the name of the NFL team housed in Washington. Ka-beesh?                                          As much as the local hand-wringing writers might want to frame this issue as a moral one, it boils down to an economic one. Until and unless there is sufficient agita generated in the fan base of the Washington Redskins to motivate those folks to stop spending any money on anything associated with the Washington Redskins, then the name is likely going to stay the way it is and the “Outrage Cycle” currently building will crest, go on the wane and then rise again in a couple of years.”
Not All Change Is Good- Do You Read Me?
Mike Bianci (Orlando Sentinel) wrote about the latest changes in recruiting regulations. “Just wait until the new recruiting rules kick in and college coaches begin inundating Billy Bluechip with phone calls, text message, smoke signals and love letters.
Rdcvespected college and high school coaches are referring to the new recruiting rules that take effect Aug. 1 when college coaches will be permitted by the NCAA to make unlimited phone calls and send unlimited text messages to high school recruits.
In the past, coaches have been limited by dead periods and were only allowed to make one phone call per month from June 15 to July 31 to recruits who had finished their sophomore year, and two phone calls per month after Aug. 1 of their junior year. The NCAA actually banned college coaches from texting recruits back in 2007, but now suddenly will allow unlimited texts and phone calls.
“It’s going to be like the wild, wild West,” (George) O’Leary says.
The NCAA likes to preach academic integrity but then pulls a stunt that will become a nightmare to high school coaches and teachers everywhere. How can you say you’re serious about education when you’re giving thousands of college head coaches and assistant coaches carte blanche to call and text high school students at all hours of the day and night?
Recruiting Guideline
Mike Bianci (Orlando Sentinel) gave us this recommendation: “Former Purdue coach Alex Agase on why he never recruited players from California: “Any kid who would leave that wonderful weather is too dumb to play for us.”
I Was Just Thinking (Uh Oh, Not Again)                                            With all the recent news about head injuries in the NFL, how come there weren’t that many in years ago (maybe in the Andy Robustelli/ Rosie Brown years)? Was it a lack of knowledge or was it because the players weren’t that big? Perhaps those players didn’t lead with their heads.                                                                                            Borscht Olympics                                                                                    Bob Molinaru (HamptonRoads.com) talked about next year’s Winter Olympics and wrote: “Estimates of how much it will cost to stage the Winter Olympics next year in Sochi, Russia, are already in the $50 billion range. Pretty steep considering that London put on the Summer Games for $14.4 billion. It’s not hitting below the Borscht Belt to note that widespread corruption – the Russian way of doing business – is blamed for the exorbitant price tag.  The Sports Curmudgeon said, “The climate for the city of Sochi is classified as “humid subtropical”; the weather there this year has seen temperatures hovering in the 50s and 60s. To be sure, the Winter Games will happen in the mountains outside the city, but once again, there is the potential for a climatic mismatch between Mother Nature and a sports extravaganza. According to a report in the St. Paul Pioneer-Press:
“Temperatures at Sochi’s Krasnaya Polyana ski resort hovered about 50 degrees this week after a cold snap the previous week when athletes competed in test events amid snowstorms with temperatures dipping to 20 degrees.
“This week temperatures reached 66 degrees in Sochi and 59 in the mountains.
“Dmitry Chernyshenko, head of the Sochi organizing committee, said Sochi’s snow-making system and other technologies will enable organizers to ‘cope with any challenges of the weather.” Was that something also said by the 2014 Super Bowl Committee?
HA! They thought that NY Winter weather might be bad for the SB.

Dreams Blog

February 8, 2013

Get It Right!
The ‘Niners staged a huge comeback in the Super Bowl, but its overall success was stifled by, what appeared to be, a pre-ordained wish, by the network, for the Ravens to win the game.
OK, I’m a sore loser but SF was the first team in SB history to have a 300-yard passer, a 100-yard runner, and TWO 100-yard receivers in a single game but not win.
I always thought that the existence of   re-play technology was in place to be able to correct incorrect calls but that play in the final minutes of the game was clearly wrong and was a game changer.
SF had 4th and goal to go on the Ravens 5. Kaepernick lofted a pass to Crabtree who was interfered with on the 2, then was held in the end zone- BUT NO CALL FOR ANYTHING. If it was called it would have given SF the ball on the Baltimore 1-yard line with a first down.
The network seemed more interested in celebrating an undeserved win than getting it right.
POOF- It’s Gone
Is A-Rod positioning himself (or is he being positioned) to be retired due to medical condition caused by an injury. The degeneration of his hip could be the vehicle that would allow the Yankees to make a claim so they wouldn’t be saddled with the remaining $114million on A-Rod’s contract on their payroll, reducing their luxury tax liability.
The Orioles were able to do this with Albert Belle’s contract.   MLB and its commissioner “Uncle Bud” Selig would like the PED black cloud to be swallowed up by this possibility.                                                                                             Fact of the day                                                                                 Dwight Perry (Seattle Times) gave us this fascinating information, “The past four Super Bowl winners — the Ravens, Giants, Packers and Saints — were the visiting team for the Eagles’ home opener those seasons, but the trend might face the ultimate test.       Among Philly’s still-unannounced home slate for 2013: the Chiefs (2-14), Lions (4-12) and Cardinals (5-11).                                            Spin                                                                                                                                    Now it’s Bob Molinaro’s (HamptonRoads.com) turn to pass long something I missed. “Except for some low-scoring eyesores, college basketball hasn’t had much to offer in the way of memorable moments this season, but nothing tops (or bottoms) Northern Illinois scoring four points – 4! – in the first half of last Saturday’s game against Eastern Michigan. After NIU’s 42-25 defeat, Northern Virginia blogger Jack Finarelli (The Sports Curmudgeon) discovered this capsule summary on the school’s website: ‘Northern Illinois posted its best defensive effort in seven seasons, allowing just 42 points on Saturday afternoon, but it came in a losing effort as the Huskies fell to Eastern Michigan, 42-25.’ Says Jack: ‘Whoever did that has a future as a Presidential press secretary.’” (BTW- the current Presidential Press Secretary, Jay Carney is pretty quick on his feet answering all of those probing press questions with poise, confidence, and conviction)                “Is any sport safe from the scourge of performance- enhancing drugs?                                                                                       “Olympic gold medalist Jim Armstrong of Canada will be suspended for 18 months after testing positive for tamoxifen, a breast-cancer drug that serves as an estrogen-blocker.          “Who’s Jim Armstrong, you ask? He’s a Paralympic curler.”
Scouting Reports
Whenever I read a scouting report for a MLB player and I see that it is thought the player was “injury prone,” I wonder what type of injuries they suffered.
Were they torn muscles and cartilages that might have been caused by muscle composition that might have overgrown supportive connections? Or, were they from broken bones caused by efforts to successfully complete plays?  
Speaking Of Being Injury Prone-
Jim Litke (Boston Herald) talked about Lindsey Vonn and her competitive drive- as opposed to some highly paid pros, who log quite a lot of time in the trainers where they to moan and groan over hang nails. Her injuries wouldn’t allow her to just bear the pain and get out there this time. “Reconstructive knee surgeries are an occupational hazard in the sport, and more than a few skiers have come back from shredded ligaments and broken bones in less than a year. Besides, Vonn is no stranger to playing with pain. She went straight from the hospital to the starting gate at the 2006 Turin Olympics, just two days after flying off the training course going well over 50 mph, and competed in four of her five planned events. Three years later, after winning a World Cup downhill, she grabbed a champagne bottle during what was supposed to be a celebratory photo-op without realizing the friend who opened it used a ski to chop off the top. The jagged glass nearly cut clean through the flexor tendon in her thumb.” Olympic hockey players admired Vonn
I Was Thinking
I know, I know- this is always hazardous to my health.
This time I was thinking about some new computing developments and wondered how many new applications Dragon.com could add. I also wondered when computing will be thought controlled.   
For Brendan
Mike Bianci (Orlando Sentinel) passed along this quote from “The Tooz” John Matuzak, the one time, hard-partying defensive tackle, of the Oakland Raiders, “On why he stayed out all night partying in New Orleans after he forbade his teammates to do so: ‘That’s why I was out in the streets. To make sure no one else was.’”
Bad Ads
I don’t want to give any mentions to those TV commercials that lacked in creativity, humor, taste, or valuable information.
The originality and humor displayed in previous years was sadly absent. The $3.5million/30 seconds price tag made some of those spots unwatchable, distasteful, and wastes of money.              Bronx Guy
The U. of Miami basketball coach, Jim Larranaga is from Parkchester and began playing organized BB while at St. Helena’s Grammar School. It seemed as though there was always a Connolly and a Larranaga in school together.
It’s nice to see him clean-up the UM program and have them currently ranked 8th in the country.
Larranaga has a team whose top six scorers are seniors- SENIORS, 4th year players, at a time when a lot of top programs are filled with one-and-done players.   

Dreams Blog

February 1, 2013

Don’t Is A Four Letter Word
The “Hand-wringers” say don’t play Dodge Ball, don’t play “Red-Rover,” don’t play “Ring-o- Leevio,” make sure you put on your elbow and knee pads when you play outdoors, don’t belly-flop down the hill in the snow on your sled, the list goes on and on.
Then they wonder why children don’t want to play outside.
When I was younger (Oh Gosh, did I just say that?) we might not have had all of the technological advancements available today- we just had fun.
As for helmets, all of the local mothers seemed to have belonged to a union of watchers perched on elbow pillows who would yell out of the window at you, “Don’t hit your head, it’ll make you stupid.”
The biggest draw for NFL football is the danger associated with it and how players deal with it.
Advice
The Sports Curmudgeon reported that, “I have a friend who is an attorney, who once dabbled in representation of sports folks, and I asked him about the likelihood of the Yankees doing that (voiding A-Rod’s deal). Here are the salient portions of his response to me: “[The Yankees] would need a court to void the contract because the CBA forbids [the Yankees doing it] … Punishments for violating the drug policy and failing drug tests can only come from MLB itself meaning Bud Selig’s office. Individual clubs cannot take adverse actions with regard to PEDs and if the Yankees tried to void this contract, the union would easily argue that was an ‘adverse action’.”
Knowing that, how possible cold it be that the Yankees would give detrimental info to MLB.
Equality
Bob Molinaro (HamptonRoads.com) asked these questions, “The NFL fined Tom Brady $10,000 for his cleats-up slide against the Ravens, deeming it unsportsmanlike conduct, but docked 49ers running back Frank Gore $10,500 for wearing his socks too low. Preferential treatment for a quarterback? Or just another example of the league’s extremely erratic penalty scale?” Ah- the “fashion Police” again is at work.
Baltimore-Frisco
Bruce Jenkins (SF Chronicle) reminisced about old time ‘Niners like Tittle, Perry, McElhenny,  and John Henry Johnson (all HOFers as well as Colts Unitas, Berry, Ameche, and Moore. “There’s no other way of saying it: Robert Irsay took the cowards way out. In the middle of that March night in ’84, a fleet of 11 Mayflower vans descended on the Colts’ headquarters, packed up the franchise an set out for Indianapolis. After weeks of alarming hints and ludicrous double-talk, Irsay ducked out of the backdoor like a common thief.                                                                            These days all seems well in that Midwestern town. People say that Peyton Manning reminded them of Unitas, and now they’re seeing traces of Manning in Andrew Luck. An endearing continuum, if you will.                                                                                            But those aren’t the Colts. They never will be. The Colts belong in Baltimore, where regret lingers to this day.”  
Quandary
I’m in a quandary.
I’ve been writing for a long time about football players who suffer brain injuries from repeated blows to the head during games and practices. At the same time I enjoy seeing boxing matches, especially those ending in KOs.
What’s the difference? Really, there isn’t any. I have to come to grips with this.
Prop Bet
Jerry Greene (Orlando Sentinel) proposed this Super Bowl prop bet; sometimes even more outlandish than this. “How long will the postgame handshake/hug last between the brothers? You choose either less or more than 7.5 seconds. (I love this bet and will take “under.”)
Bankrupcy
The Sports Curmudgeon talked about QB Vince Young filing for bankruptcy because he couldn’t repay a $1.9million bank loan, and even though he signed the papers he shouldn’t be required to repay the loan because his representatives didn’t explain that to him.
The SC pointed out, “Vince Young spent 4 years as an eligible student-athlete at the University of Texas. Presumably, in that 4-year timeframe, he took a few courses that were at the collegiate level of intellectual pursuit and then proceeded to secure grades in those courses that would maintain his GPA at an acceptable level and make it appear that he was making progress toward a degree thereby maintaining his eligibility to play football for Texas.”
That’s just sad.
Deep Background
Scott Ostler (SF Chronicle) related a story by the late Bill Rigney about Stan Musial. “Players around the National League were up in arms about the lousy hitter’s background at Sportsman’s Park in St. Louis, home of the Cardinals. It was almost impossible for hitters to pick up pitches coming out of the white expanse in center field. Rigney mentioned it to the Cardinals’ great, Musial, who looked puzzled and said, “Rig, I never noticed.”
John Smoltz
Tom Robinson (HamptonRoads.com) talked about the career of John Smoltz, who will be eligible for induction into the MLB-HOF in 2015. In 21 years he had a 213-155 w/l with 154 saves in relief. Although he pitched 6 years in relief, he still posted 3074 Ks. His WHIP as a starter was 1.2 and as a reliever- 1.7./                                                     
Random Evidence Of A Cluttered
Greg Cote (Miami Herald) sent these along: “Wes Welker’s wife ranted against Ray Lewis on Facebook, alluding to a murder charge and six children by four wives. What a lie! Everybody knows Lewis never married any of those women.
“]uMavericks center Chris Kaman said: “We started letting women vote. Now we’re letting homosexuals get married. So why all of a sudden are we taking away the right for people to own guns?” The good news? A player with no endorsement deals need not worry about sponsors dropping him.”
Geezer Report  
Mike Bianci (Orlando Sentinel) talked about Ozzie Osbourne and his gang, “Did you see where Ozzy Osbourne and Black Sabbath are reuniting and putting out their first album in 35 years. I’m not saying these guys are old , but I hear they’re recording a sequel to “Iron Man” called “Iron Deficiency Man.”
Cote’s Cote
Greg Cote (Miami Herald) was astonished and reported: “The National Chicken Council reports Americans will eat 1.23 billion chicken wings on (Super Bowl) Sunday. That is astonishing. I don’t mean that number. I mean that there is a “National Chicken Council.”