Dreams Blog

August 30, 2013

Ichiro
I’m happy about the Yankee players reaction when Ichiro got that hit, his 4000th , at the Stadium. Nobody was tempted to deny Yankees outfielder the respect he deserved when he recorded his 4,000th hit. So what if 1,278 of them came while he played in Japan? That’s still close to 3000 in the US majors.
A Long Story
Alfonso Soriano has reaped the benefits of his reunion with Kevin Long, the Yankees batting coach. Long has tweaked Soriano’s hitting and made him the right-handed power hitter that NY needed.
Heads vs. Knees Irony
Bob Molinaro (HamptonRoads.com) warned: “While evaluating the potential consequences of new NFL rules that are meant to reduce head injuries, two words come to mind: “cruel irony.” The NFL wants tacklers to adjust their target area to stay away from risky hits above the shoulders. But when defensive players go too low on a ball carrier or receiver, they make violent contact with the most vulnerable part of an athlete’s body: The knees. The modifying of tackling techniques appears to hold the potential for a classic “choose-your-poison” scenario in which the NFL reduces concussions, but at the cost of more shredded ACLs. Don’t think players aren’t worried about it.”
Molinaro Marinara
In passing Now that Congress is threatening to intervene in order to get the NFL Players Association to agree to HGH testing, we all know what happens next: nothing. C’mon, it’s Congress. NASCAR teamed with actress Alyssa Milano to create a line of fashionable apparel for women race fans. I am picturing a tastefully sequined Confederate flag.”
Jet Circus
Rich Cimini (ESPNNY.com) on Jets owner Woody Johnson before Saturday’s Giants game, “People who spoke to Johnson after Sanchez’s embarrassing performance in Tennessee on Dec. 17 said he was utterly disgusted with his onetime franchise quarterback. They say there was a “never again” look in his eyes.
You can bet Johnson isn’t thrilled by the prospect of opening a new season –- at home, no less –- with the same old quarterback getting booed by his PSL-paying customers. He doesn’t want that kind of karma in his stadium, and when Johnson doesn’t want something — well, look what he did to Darrelle Revis.
Despite a few glaring mistakes, Sanchez hasn’t played his way out of a job. He also hasn’t made people forget the 26 turnovers last season. Then again, this preseason isn’t about him. It’s about Smith and his learning curve. Ryan tried to downplay expectations.
“I don’t want to say, ‘Look, he has to look like Phil Simms in the Super Bowl,'” he said, alluding to Simms’ classic 22-for-25 day in Super Bowl XXI.
If Smith pitches a near-perfect game, it’ll make Sanchez the highest-paid backup in the league. It would generate a buzz around the team, and Johnson lives for the buzz. But how many championships has that produced?”
You Can’t Win A Championship In Preseason
You can lose one. Rich Cimini (ESPSNY.com) gave an opinion with which I agree.
“The coach might have fired himself, because his quarterback situation went from questionable to an absolute mess. Sanchez suffered an injury to his throwing shoulder, and Smith, who threw three interceptions and took an unnecessary safety in the 24-21 overtime win over the New York Giants, isn’t ready to take over the offense.
Ryan’s challenging season just got a whole lot harder, and he knows it. His behavior in his postgame news conference went from ultra-defensive to bizarre as he parried with reporters who grilled him about his ill-fated decision. At one point, he turned his back to a reporter and was facing sideways as he rambled on about his reasoning. It was weird.
“It was my decision all the way,” he said, going on to explain that he played Sanchez because he wanted to win the game.”
Jane McManus (ESPNNY.com) also gave her agreeable opinion, “I understand being second-guessed when an injury happens,” Ryan said, “but that’s football. Ryan’s decision might have gotten his presumptive starting quarterback hurt. After rookie Geno Smith threw three interceptions in the first half, Sanchez’s return to the starting spot looked clear. When Smith came out of the game in the fourth quarter, Ryan tapped Sanchez over Matt Simms, whose helmet was already on.
“If it wasn’t important, I would not have put him in there,” Ryan said.”
HEY COACH- IT’S ONLY PRESEASON.
NFL=Not For Long Ian O’Connor (ESPNNY.com) said that Rex Ryan is unfit to coach the Jets. “The New York Jets are stuck with Rex Ryan now, just like they are stuck with Geno Smith. “The Jets are alarmingly weak at the two most important positions in the sport — head coach and quarterback — and only Smith has a good excuse for his performance, or lack thereof.
But the 50-year-old Ryan is no novice (coach), even if he often acts like one. In his fifth season with the Jets, Rex proved in this exhibition game with the New York Giants that he still has no idea how to coach/develop/protect quarterbacks, and that he still isn’t fit to lead.
Ryan is a middle manager making CEO money. He’s a nice guy and a very good defensive coordinator who is overmatched as a head coach.
He’s a Jets employee who should’ve been let go with Mike Tannenbaum before the new general manager, John Idzik, took office.
It’s too late for Johnson to do anything about this embarrassing night at MetLife Stadium because you don’t fire a coach before Week 1 of the regular season, and because there isn’t a low-risk replacement on Ryan’s staff (though I’d gamble on the recently promoted defensive coordinator Dennis Thurman over new offensive coordinator Marty Mornhinweg, who was 5-27 as head coach in Detroit). Firing Rex now likely improves the odds of an ugly 6-10 year devolving into a season that could put Rich Kotite’s two to shame.
Quote From Dwight Perry Seattle Times
From Brad Dickson (Omaha World-Herald)- “Rays manager Joe Madden ha 20- foot boa constrictor brought into the clubhouse as a motivational ploy: ‘with all the performance-enhancers in baseball, by the time it left it was a 40-foot snake.’”

Dreams Blog

August 23, 2013

Upon Further Review
I don’t want to comment about this whole thing yet because the player’s union and the umpire’s union still have to vote on this yet. So, “Uncle Bud’s” announcement might be premature.
Yet From Bob Molinaro
Bob Molinaro (HamptonRoads.com) had this review thought- “Major League Baseball will not use challenge flags like the NFL when it implements its expanded instant replay system. Managers simply will walk up to an umpire and request a review. I was sort of hoping MLB would include a theatrical twist, like having managers lob red resin bags from the dugout.”
And From Gene Collier
Gene Collier (Pgh. Post-Gazette) gave us his opinion, “My problem with replay in baseball is that baseball’s whole narrative, for one game or across one season, is how we deal with failure. The pitcher is going to hang a curveball, the hitters are going to look at strikes and swing at balls, the fielders are going to drop easy flies and let grounders through their legs, the manager is going to make strategical errors that ignite and sustain discussion until the next round of mistakes begins tomorrow.
Why, in this theater, can umpires not be allowed to make mistakes?
Bob Costas, whom I admire very much, said to the New York Times on this issue:
“You can’t have a World Series game, or an important game in the pennant race, decided by an obvious missed call.”
Why not?
That’s life.
Baseball is life.
But only for the moment. Soon enough it’ll be like all everything else, an existence folded into the quotidian human boredom of staring endlessly at a glowing screen.”
Some baseball arguments can continue for decades- I still think that Yogi Berra tagged Jackie Robinson out when Robinson TRIED to steal home in the 1955 World Series.
Heads vs. Knees Irony
Bob Molinaro warned: “While evaluating the potential consequences of new NFL rules that are meant to reduce head injuries, two words come to mind: “cruel irony.” The NFL wants tacklers to adjust their target area to stay away from risky hits above the shoulders. But when defensive players go too low on a ball carrier or receiver, they make violent contact with the most vulnerable part of an athlete’s body: The knees. The modifying of tackling techniques appears to hold the potential for a classic “choose-your-poison” scenario in which the NFL reduces concussions, but at the cost of more shredded ACLs. Don’t think players aren’t worried about it.”
More Marinara
“In December, it will be 50 years since Naval Academy quarterback Roger Staubach won the Heisman Trophy. Sorry if that makes some of you (us) feel old.”
The Circus Is Coming to Town
Rich Cimini (ESPNNY.com) writes: “Clearly, Rex Ryan was leaning this way Wednesday when he ripped Geno Smith for his “brutal” practice. One thing I found interesting: In announcing the starter on Twitter, the Jets made no mention of it being Ryan’s decision. It was presented as a team decision. This is noteworthy in light of GM John Idzik declaring early in camp that he will have “a pretty big role” in the picking the quarterback — an ill-advised statement that did nothing but undercut his coach’s authority.
If Ryan gives Smith a shot against the Giants, it shows how badly the organization wants to replace Sanchez. It’s waiting … waiting … waiting for Smith to give them something — anything — to validate making him the starter.”
A Different Time
Greg Cote (Miami Herald) reminisced about the ’72 Dolphins, “Everything was so different back when those Dolphins were going 17-0 to create the sport’s only perfect season, before or since. In sports, those were like prehistoric times compared to today. That team was frozen in a black-and-white Daguerreotype relative to the explosion of color and action that would soon come. Sports operated in a vacuum next to now. Contrasted to the maniacal attention and celebrity attached to LeBron James and the champion Heat today, the ’72 Dolphins were closer to a secret.
The boom was coming, but it was no there yet. The average NFL player salary in 1972 was $27,500, and, even considering the much lower cost of living, that pales to what athletes make now.
Players routinely had second jobs. Dick Anderson was an insurance agent who would call clients before and after practices. “In those days you had to have another job if you wanted to get ahead,” Anderson said. “Shula was always telling me to get off the phone!”
Knicks-Nets
How long until the NBA begins- how about Dec. 5th when the Knicks play the Bklyn. Nets for the 1st. time in Brooklyn? We have the makings of an old time Dodger-Giant’s rivalry starting to heat up.
We heard Paul Pierce, who’s disliked the Knicks from his days as a Celt, declaring that NYC belongs to the Nets. And, now Raymond Felton answered back by saying, “They will never take over the city. Because we’ve got ‘New York’ on our chest. “They’ve got ‘Brooklyn’ on their chest, and we’ve got ‘New York.’ They’ll never take over the city. This is getting good!
More From Greg
“Retired NASCAR driver Kyle Petty said Danica Patrick, ‘can go fast, but she can’t race.’ Hmmm, Kyle, you won only eight races in 829 starts over 30 years. Quiet, please.”
Reminder Dwight Perry (Seattle Times) reminded us that Nov 19th had been declared World Toilet Day. “In keeping with the theme, any college football teams still winless by then receive an automatic bowl bid.”
Perry Patter
Dwight Perry said that, “A zoo in Hnan, China was caught trying to pass off a dog as a lion. Don’t laugh- Matt Mille got away with it for years in Detroit.”
Comment The Sports Curmudgeon is one of our “Sports Guys” who reads my stuff and sent this along- “Good column today. Regarding coaches “worrying” that rookies can put their uniforms on correctly, I suspect that the most important part of that routine would be to assure than the rookies do not have their helmets on backwards. Makes playing the game much more difficult…”

Dreams Blog

August 16, 2013

Proper Perspective
How do ball players taking PEDs, college athletes selling their autographs, and amateurs receiving appearance money affect my everyday living? They don’t. That’s why those reports don’t mean that much to me.
Biggest Concern For NFL Coaches
After the first week of pre-season games, the most important thing for coaches to think about is if the rookies can put on their uniforms correctly.
DAMONSTRE
One player that I will keep an eye on is Damontre Moore, a 3rd rounder out of Texas A & M who is 20 years old and 6’4 250lbs right now. I said “Right now” because we’ll have to see if additional weight affects his speed. He’s penciled in as a rushing end, DE at the moment.
Ohm Youngmisuk, of ESPNNY.com wrote about the preseason game in Pittsburgh and said, “Moore has shown he could be more than just a prospect to develop. He was a presence with his speed, which was on display when he exploded out of nowhere and made a leaping block on a fourth-and-29 punt at the Steelers’ 17 with 11:27 to go in the first quarter.”
Not Getting Into That
Joe McKnight, Jets RB, had a pretty good revolving door going when he talked to the press about his head injury. Rich Cimini had this quote by McKnight, “I’m just getting back in the flow of things. When the doctors clear me, I can get back into the flow of things.” Or maybe he could put it this way, “I feel a lot more like I do now than I did before.”
A Look At 2014
Wallace Matthews (ESPNNY.com) gave us a peek. “With Mo getting the night off, it took two relief pitchers — Boone Logan and David Robertson — to do the job one man has handled exclusively for the past 17 seasons.
And while, when he is right, Rivera does his job with an effortless grace that makes it appear that literally anyone could go out there and do it just as well, Logan, and especially Robertson, generally turn the job of getting three outs into a kind of performance art played out on a high wire. And it was clear that the Yankee Stadium crowd, accustomed for so long to eight-inning games followed by a three-out exit recital, is not entirely happy with the idea of a roller-coaster ride at the end of the game. “I’m not him,” Robertson said, jerking his head toward Rivera’s locker, which adjoins his in the Yankees clubhouse. “I’m never going to be him. It’s not going to be silky smooth.” But it will be exciting, which might not be exactly what you want in a ninth-inning specialist. With his effortless efficiency, Rivera has spoiled a generation of baseball fans who have forgotten the kind of angst and agita that baseball fans in 29 other ballparks experience on a nightly basis. It was a David Robertson ninth inning, and, luckily for Yankee fans, there is always more than one way to reach the end of a ballgame. Robertson just happens to prefer taking the rough way home, a route that will take some getting used to. “I guess Yankee fans are just going to have to learn to adjust,” Robertson said. Like watching anyone other than Mariano Rivera pitch the ninth inning, it won’t be easy.
The Sports Curmudgeon Told Me That
The SC talked about my last column and said, “IF indeed all of the charges against him are false/misleading/wrongfully placed, the answer to the question posed to him would have to be “Hell NO!” IF he were totally innocent and falsely accused here, there just isn’t any other answer that makes sense – lawyered up or not. If I were charged with kidnapping and murdering Jimmy Hoffa and the question were put to me in a press conference, my answer – with my lawyer standing by my side – would be “Absolutely not!” I say that not to “convict” A-Rod but merely to point out that he does himself no favors when he opens his mouth. His best defense may be to ‘Shut the Heck Up!’”
Suspensions
Greg Cote wrote in the Miami Herald that baseball had suspended 13 players, including A-Rod, in one day. “Call it,” he said, “A Fakers Dozen.”
“Little Artie” Donovan
Artie Donovan was the first ever draft choice of the Baltimore Colts and was never little. He once proclaimed, “You know you’re big, when you get into the bathtub and the water in the toilet rises.”
Just How Bad Are The Marlins
The Sports Curmudgeon told me, “They are the only NL team whose winning percentage is below .400. The main reason they do not win is that they cannot score runs; in those 112 games, the Marlins have only scored 359 runs (3.2 runs per game). If you project that total to a full season, the Marlins will score only 519 runs. Let me put that into perspective for you- in the Marlins brief history, the team record for fewest runs scored in a season is 581 runs. The 1962 NY Mets – the team that lost 120 games that year – scored 619 runs.
Earth To Rich Athletes
Scott Ostler (SF Chronicle) told us about Drew Brees leaving a $3 tip in a fast food restaurant. “You don’t have to go all Elvis and buy your waitress a new Cadillac, but blow the dust off that wallet, old sport, and throw down a tenner for the woman making eight bucks an hour and sharing tips with the cooks, OK? You can write it off. By the way, seriously, Drew Brees makes $57,794.52 per day.”
Futurewatch Bob Molinaro (HamptonRoads.com) wrote, “Technology can be a wonderful thing. The San Francisco 49ers’ new stadium, set to open in time for the 2014 NFL season, will feature an app that keeps fans updated on the length of bathroom and beer lines. There’s a clear symmetry to an app like that.”
Investigate
Brad Dickson (Omaha World-Herald) pounded Johnny Manziel, “The NCAA is investigating Manziel for allegedly being paid to sign autographs after he arrived in Miami to watch the BCS national championship game with his personal assistant. A college freshman with a personal assistant? How about investigating that?”

Dreams Blog

August 9, 2013

Sally Said
Sally Jenkins (DC Post) gave her opinion of A-Rod, “He is a tone-deaf egotist who never understood the deep resentment he engendered by being baseball’s highest paid player and then not producing astronomic numbers. The reaction to him by fans and critics has always been excessive to the point of disturbing. My friend Joe Posnanski wrote maybe the truest thing ever about A-Rod and his audience: He gives them “guilt-free hate.” If A-Rod committed some sweeping act of malfeasance by impeding an investigation — if he genuinely deserves to be thrown out of the game forever — then it should be an open-and-shut case. Instead we have “negotiations” over whether he gets a lifetime ban vs. a 15-month suspension? This is a rational choice? Hardly. The gulf between those options suggests the commissioner is as bent as A-Rod is accused of being. If Selig can force A-Rod to make a deal, then we never have to see whether MLB’s evidence would hold up in arbitration or a court room.
According to the New York Daily News, MLB officials have told Biogenesis founder Anthony Bosch they would cover his legal expenses, indemnify him against litigation and put in a good word with any law-enforcement agencies if he cooperated with the investigation. Before Bosch made his deal with baseball, he tried to get money out of Rodriguez. All of that puts the commissioner in bed with a steroids dealer and semi-extortionist.
The steroid hysterics will holler that nothing matters but A-Rod’s guilt; all the rest are technicalities. Yes, A-Rod is lawyering up and may fight his case on technicalities — and what’s wrong with that? Technicalities matter: They exist to keep people from being railroaded, and they are the entire difference between adjudication and show trials. Otherwise what we get feels uncomfortably like judges writing confessions for defendants and forcing them to sign under threats of the gulag. Insisting on due process is not the same thing as protecting or coddling cheaters.”
Sticking It To Them
Dwight Perry wrote, “Those PED users awaiting the announcement of their suspensions must be sitting on pins and—Nah, too easy.”
Show Me The Evidence
MLB has intimated all along that it has overwhelming evidence against A-Rod; but so far we’ve only heard allegations. IF (that could be a big if) there is big proof- where is it?
The Commissioner should conduct an evidence presentation, and then issue a lifetime ban to A-Rod. If nothing is shown, a lot of doubts to its existence is sure to follow.
Smoke And Mirrors
If there is such a “preponderance” (MLBs word) of evidence against A-Rod held by MLB, why can’t they reveal just one little bit of it- unless there isn’t any actual proof that isn’t hear-say, allegation, or outright slander.
Is it coming down to “Uncle Bud” stomping his foot, folding his arms, and saying, “Because I said so.”
Just whose game is baseball? Remember, firstly, it is a game- a game played by boys and girls, men and women of all ages (from many nations). Nobody- NOBODY owns baseball. Millionaires own teams- not the game.
Greg Cote (Miami Herald) wrote, “What guys like Braun and Rodriguez should be doing is publicly explaining themselves fully and asking their fans, teammates and opponents to forgive them. Not eventually. Not as a selling point to a future autobiography. NOW.”
I thought the burden of proof of guilt beyond a reasonable doubt rested with the accuser. If Rodriguez is PROVEN guilty, then he should be banned for life as should Clemens, Sosa, as well as the other steroid users.
Just don’t make unfounded accusations.
Michael Young
36-years old, bats right, average 196 hits (2334 total),16 HRs and 86 RBIs over 14 years, and .789 OPS.
Sanchez-Smith
I feel that Geno Smith could be “the real deal,” in time. Yet we’ll probably see Mark Sanchez start the season as the #1 QB. Sanchez has experience and has shown flashes of brilliance without the consistency that has plagued him for his entire career.
Smith has the confidence, swagger, and the arm for a “West Coast Offense.” He needs the experience only enemy defenses can provide- especially with the no-huddle offense. He is taking the baby steps all rookie QBs have to take before sliding into the #1 slot- maybe by game 3 or 4.
Whistling In The Dark
Jets Head Coach Rex Ryan said, “Our fans have a right to do anything — I’m not going to say I’m disappointed with the fans — but I think we need to move forward,” Ryan said. “The things in the past are in the past. Let’s focus on what we have in front of us. We’re all going to make mistakes. … I had a bad year also last year. Hopefully, our fans are all united 100 percent.” In the past-ha! Good luck with that. How often can a zebra change its stripes? How often can a leopard change its spots? About as often as Sanchez can change his accuracy and consistency.
False Start
Q: What do you call it when an NFL player is late getting to practice?
A: Arraign delay.”
Play For Pay
In The Midst of the O’Bannon v. NCAA class action suit, we have the Johnny Manziel hubbub about him selling his autograph. The Sports Curmudgeon commented, “If someone is willing to pay him for signing a piece of paper, why does the NCAA or the school have anything to say about that? On the other hand, those are the current conditions by which Manziel has his athletic scholarship and maintains his eligibility to play college football. It will be interesting to see how the NCAA pursues this matter in light of the pending O’Bannon case. Personally, it seems to me that Johnny Manziel is an immature young man who has an addictive relationship to his celebrity status and a huge helping of entitlement going for him. He would not be my favorite poster-child for taking on the NCAA and its arcane rules, but if he is the one on the spot at the moment, he will have to do.”

Dreams Blog

August 2, 2013

Integrity
I hope “Uncle Bud” Selig uses the “Integrity Of the Game” clause to stop Alex Rodriguez from making a mockery of MLB rules with his appeals processes. Banning him would be a fair and reasonable action. The only question in my mind is the length of such banishment.
The AP told us that, “Three-time MVP Alex Rodriguez of the New York Yankees stands to receive the longest suspension. While 50 games is the standard for a first offense, the stiffer penalties for some players are tied to other alleged violations, including not being truthful to MLB investigators.” He reportedly will be joined by Texas outfielder Nelson Cruz, San Diego shortstop Everth Cabrera and Detroit shortstop Jhonny Peralta, Oakland pitcher Bartolo Colon, Toronto outfielder Melky Cabrera, San Diego catcher Yasmani Grandal, Yankees catcher Francisco Cervelli and Seattle catcher Jesus Montero.
“The Yankees expected Rodriguez to be accused of recruiting other athletes for the clinic, attempting to obstruct MLB’s investigation and not being truthful with MLB in the past when he discussed his relationship with Dr. Anthony Galea, who pleaded guilty two years ago to a federal charge of bringing unapproved drugs into the United States from Canada.”
Just What Miami Needs
Greg Cote (Miami Herald) told us that the Heat was looking to get 7 foot Greg Oden from the Portland trailblazers. The cost will probably not be very much because remember they were the team that drafted Oden one spot ahead of Kevin Durant in 2007. They are also the team that passed on Michael Jordan to draft Sam Bowie in 1984. Greg wrote, “I suspect Riley’s vision might have included Oden, whom he has long coveted, when he said, “When 2014 hits, we’ll be ready to deal with that. We’ll be prepared for anything.” Every current Heat player will be eligible for free agency next summer. An Oden who is completely healthy then could be a huge asset in convincing LeBron to re-sign long term, the club’s absolute imperative. A healthy Oden also would be a hedge against possibly losing Chris Bosh or others in free agency. Oden’s immense potential can hardly be overstated. He was a No. 1 overall draft pick. He still is only 25, and a very low-mileage 25, after playing only one season at Ohio State and then parts of two NBA years equating to one full season. He is 7 feet and 275 pounds, and he is medically set to be cleared for full contact in August and to be ready for the start of somebody’s training camp. “Oden” and “knee surgeries” have been the word-association game for so long, it is easy to forget, and bears remembering, that in 82 career NBA games — the equal of one full season — he has averaged 9.4 points, 7.3 rebounds, 1.4 blocks and 58 percent shooting in only 22 minutes per game. His productivity has never been an issue, when healthy. That continues a massive “if” until proved otherwise, but, for Miami, right now, that’s a calculated, smart gamble.”
Run On Sentence
Dwight Perry (Seattle Times) quoted baseball pariah, Pete Rose, on the Dan Patrick Show, on Ryan Braun’s suspension, “In my eyes he ought to feel fortunate he only got 65 days. I got 23 years.”
MLB-HOF Induction
Greg Cote (Miami Herald) reported from Cooperstown: “Baseball’s Hall of Fame weekend culminates Sunday with the induction of three new members. Cooperstown visitors be warned, though: Not a great autograph opportunity, as all three inductees have been dead at least 70 years.”
Hoo-ha Hula
I feel that all of the back-and-forth with A-Rod is him trying to position himself for a medical retirement (with pay) before MLB issues its decision that may contain a life-time suspension (with no money) for A-Rod.
It’s Best To Remember
Don’t believe anything anybody says about A-Rod’s woes.
I was trying to remember if A-Rod had a lively bat during his recent time in A and Double-A. He might be getting too old to swing a big bat.
Ian O’Connor (ESPNNY.com) said, “Mix-ups? Alex Rodriguez is a living, breathing mix-up.
Your Serve Dwight Perry reported (Seattle Times), “Two Thai badminton players — and former playing partners — got into a fistfight during a change of ends during the championship match at the Canada Open. In other words, during the shuttle, one got cold-cocked.”
Molinaro Marinara
Bob Molinaro (HamptonRoads.com) wrote:
“Alex Rodriguez is hurt. He’s not hurt. Who cares? The A-Rod-Yankees saga is the worst reality show ever.
It’s a sign of the times that two of the happiest words in college and pro football are ‘charges dropped.’
It’s at least mildly suspicious when North Carolina basketball player P.J. Hairston is cleared of all charges related to his June 5 arrest, but what’s more fishy is UNC hasn’t been hit with anything yet by the NCAA for its academic scandal. The bluebloods seem to have a way of escaping scandal.”
They Said It
Dwight Perry (Seattle Times)- “A 22-year-old in Beaverton, Ore., made the mistake of using a baseball bat and a knife to rod a store- a store named Discount Gun Sales.
The owner merely pulled out some of his inventory, ordered him to drop his weapons and held him until police arrived.
Gabe Kapler (ex-outfielder) tweeted that Buster Olney (ESPN) said to Duston Pedroia (Bos 2nd baseman) that (Curt) Shilling wants to know why you’re not hitting more HR’s.
Pedroia: ‘Because I’m not facing him.’
R.J. Currie (SportsDeke.com) on Carly Rae Jenson’s off target ceremonial toss before a Rays game: ‘You’d think a singer would have better pitch control.’”
Quick Quiz
The Sports Curmudgeon sent along this quiz: “Which is the greatest number: A. The number of Wall Street financiers to be indicted by the Obama Administration after 8 years in office? B. The number of good ideas that have come from Michelle Bachmann in the last 6 months? C. The ESPN ratings for WNBA games?”
In A Galaxy Far, Far Away
The Sports Curmudgeon said that, “Dwight Perry ruminated on the Miami Marlins place in the cosmos recently in the Seattle Times:
‘Scientists have discovered a planet 300 light years from Earth.
Or roughly the same distance between the Marlins and playoff contention.’”